All posts tagged: blogging

New tool in the studio

Over the holidays, the studio welcomed its newest tool, a plotter (cutter). There are many on the market, each having their own pros and cons, but after having done some research, I found the one for me. I have always had a love for words.. quotes and sayings… and being a font addict with a reasonable handle on graphic design and a love for Adobe Illustrator, the possibilities with this machine are endless! It cuts so much more than vinyl… cardstock, fabric, stencils for glass etching and fabric stenciling, heat transfer for clothing.. and I have even sourced reflective heat transfer for clothing. That may sound crazy to most of the world, but living in Norway, the dark season makes wearing reflects mandatory. My son has decided he wants to start a business selling his own reflects designs.. and he is only 8! Time to make space in the studio. Yesterday I made my first wall piece from vinyl. Well beyond the standard size of the plotter (the wording is just over a meter high), …

leather handles on felt bags

A while back, I blogged about the raw wool felted laptop bag (see post) that I created for myself, and I thought I would show how the handles were made. Store bought handles of all shapes, sizes and colours are available in most craft stores (or online), but in my opinion, nothing beats a good quality, handmade, adjustable thick leather strap with solid brass fittings. I have not used a pattern for doing this.. I simply gauge the size based on the bag and what feels comfortable. The only factor to consider is the width of your buckle. I cut five pieces of leather, one for the strap, and two shorter pieces that are doubled over and secured to the felt itself using chicago screws (leather bond optional), and two narrower pieces that are looped to keep the strap from flailing about. The side pieces are very simple.. an oval hole in the middle for the buckle to pivot, and in this case two holes matched up on each side.  Punch matched holes in your …

The life of a Maker… studio time

I managed to get in some studio time of late to finish off some orders, and get a few pieces photographed. Years ago I read that an artist should take photos of everything they make regardless of whether it is going to be a personal gift or go up for sale (or already sold for that matter). Time to start getting into the habit. Jewelry photography is a tedious task, requiring very bright lights with a light tent to control reflections and shadows. I keep thinking I need to set up a photo spot in the studio, such that it is not such an effort setting everything up each time. My children spend quite a bit of time with me in the studio.. asking questions, playing on the floor.. digging through all the tools and supplies while dreaming of what they want to make next (they now even have their own cupboard of supplies). It has been a productive time, and with studio visits scheduled later this week with neighborhood children, there will be lots …

the big picture

As most artists know all too well, November and December is the busy season, holiday sales carry many of us through the rest of our year. Months ago, as the end of summer approached, the deadline for deciding in which holiday shows to participate came up, and I had to make a decision. In past years I have had open studios, inviting the public in to my atelier to see how and where my products are made. Last year, I took part in the Designers Fair (juried entry) at DogA, the Norwegian Center for Design and Architecture on Hausmannsgate in Oslo, 10,000 people in 2 days – exhausting but worthwhile! This year, the invites for various shows came in and I realized that regardless of what options I chose, the workload would be pretty much the same, long hard days in the studio working on new series and collections, evenings back in the studio polishing silver or ironing textiles, display work, pricing, labeling, packaging supplies, being away from my children on the holiday weekends, and stressing …

my latest addition (obsession)

Sock knitting machines!.. ahh.. I know this may sound crazy, and quite honestly I was not sure as to whether this should go on my studio blog or not, as this is more of  a ‘me’ thing. so.. no.. I am not going into the sock making business.. (at least not as far as I know!) (…continues below photo) restored and purring like a kitten Since first learning of these machines over a year ago, I have patiently (well.. my husband might disagree with that statement) been waiting for the right one to find me, during that time, I have read so much about them, and the history behind them appeals to me in a significant way. In the late 1800’s and first half of the 1900’s, sock knitting machines were produced in many countries around the world. During war times, many wives/mothers were left at home, some struggling to make ends meet. the answer?.. the sock knitting machine. Women all over the world purchased these machines, and through the same company, purchased wool. After …

bomaki shibori – tutorial

Lately I have had been reading everything I can get my hands on regarding shibori, the japanese art of creating texture and colour on cloth. There are an incredible variety of styles and techniques that are encompassed in the Shibori classification. Here are some photos (and a quick tutorial) of a piece I made using the bomaki shibori technique.

Designernes eget Julemarked – DogA

This weekend I participated in the Design Fair at DogA (Norwegian Center for Design and Architecture) It is one of Oslo most anticipated annual christmas markets. Around 10,000 people attend this event annually, queuing up outside in all sorts of weather to be able to get their hands on some of the latest in Norwegian Design. I am genuinely pleased with my weekend, and learned so much in the process. Prior to attending the event, I gave myself a goal for sales and I must admit, I exceeded my expectations. I went through 750 business cards, and realize that next time I need to bring more! The chance to get ones work seen by so many in such a short period of time is a fantastic opportunity. But most of all I met some lovely people in the process, both in the way of designers who were selling their work, as well as customers who left with smiles on their faces. One young lady in particular stands out in my mind… she returned three times …